Nehru Trust Awards

Nehru Trust Awards

The Trust aims to achieve its mission by making it possible for scholars and professionals from India and the UK to develop and share skills relevant to these subjects and to gain access to Indian cultural resources both in India and in the UK.

The Trust’s primary activity is an annual awards programme for individual scholars and museum professionals from both countries in order to enable them to study, carry out research or undertake training in both India and the UK. The awards programme is announced each autumn; awards are made in late March and must be taken up within the subsequent year (1 April to 31 March).

The Trust also administers grants on behalf of the V&A Jain Art Fund, and works in collaboration with the Charles Wallace India Trust with whom it offers an annual joint UK Visiting Fellowship.

 

Dr Syamali Das

Baluchar silk and temple terracottas: a comparative study of motifs

The award gave me a good opportunity to travel and visit many terracotta temples in remote villages in Bengal that remained unknown and undocumented. I have (2001) prepared a popular article and two research papers are ready for publication. I interact usefully with a stream of students and research workers from the Kala Bhavana, Visva Bharati and Burdwan University Bardhaman.

Swati Sengupta

Dokra Bronzes of Tribal India

This award gave me an opportunity to do fieldwork and learn the technique of lost-wax process in Dokra bronze-casting. As a student of Design (BFA) I was able to use the technique to make jewellery and incorporate the Dokra Bronze tribal forms in two dimensional textile design. Having graduated from Kala Bhavana, Visva Bharati University Santiniketan, I am embarking (2001) on History of Art at the National Museum Institute, New Delhi. I have also made a proposal for research for a Junior Fellowship in Visual Art from the Department of Culture (Govt of India).

Harinarayana Nilam

The formative years of the Madras Museum

The detailed history of museums has not been attempted much in India, but I had an inkling that such a detailed study may throw considerable light on development of the museum as an institution in our country. I also felt that the Madras Museum, which was in its 15th decade at that time, could be an ideal starting point for such a study because it had been carefully groomed through the years of its existence to attain an eminent position in its field. The first award from the NTICVA to me was meant to carry out such a study of the first gfive decades of the Madras Museum.

Dr Kalpana K T Adikonda

Documentation of artefacts from India housed in UK museums

Kakoli Barkakoti

Assamese paintings in UK

Vikas Dilawari

Past in Present: Care of the Gothic Revival

Although I had been in the UK for a year and had obtained an MA in Conservation Studies from the Institute of Advanced Arhitectural Studies, University of York on a Charles Wallace India Trust scholarship, and had formal qualifications, I was lacking practical training. This is where the Fellowship was tailor made. In India I had the distinction of being one of the earliest practicising conservation architectects, but in retrospect I feel that this fellowship made all the difference to my career.

Kristine Michael

Indian studio pottery movement

I work as a practising ceramic artist in New Delhi and Pondicherry. I began my research projects as self-initiated ones, because as a part time visiting faculty at the TVB School of Habitat Studies, IIT Design Centre, Bombay, and the MS University Baroda, I realised the lack of any scholarship in the area of ceramics by art historians. I wanated to teach about the Indian historical engagement with ceramics, seeing myself at the present end of a long line of makers.

Pratip Kumar Mitra

An investigation of the medieval cities of Gaur and Pandua

For study and documentation of unpublished UK archives and collections relating to the medieval cities of Gaur and Pandua

Radhika Sahgal

Miniature paintings and works on paper: Conservation and care

I was already in the process of conserving Indian miniatures but the award gave me a chance not only to be involved in practical conservation at the V&A but also to visit and discuss the treatment techniques employed by other Paper Conservation Studios. This gave me an opportunity to get acquainted with new materials and techniques. I procured samples of some of these materials in the UK and since then have been able to find some locally. There is unfortunately still a dearth of materials for conservation in India.

Chandrahasa Bhat

An internship to study the latest techniques relating to the conservation of paintings at the Hamilton Kerr Institute, Cambridge University.

My internship in the paper conservation department at the Hamilton Kerr Institute at the University of Cambridge was really interesting and exciting. It is not an exaggeration if I sawy it is a well equipped conservation studio with highly experienced conservators. My aim was to learn some advanced techniques implemented in conservation, mainly on Indian miniature paintings and western paintings on paper. I was looking for various techniques on consolidation, lining of paper paintings, relaxing of cockled and wrinkled paintings, filling of missing areas and mounting techniques.

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